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Edge 510, 810 and 1000 compared

Edge 510, 810 and 1000
At Cycle Art, we regularly get customers asking the difference between the 3 top end Garmin GPS computers. In this article, our resident technology geek takes us through the features of the latest Edge computers and explains what it means for you the cyclist.

Edge 510Edge 510
Garmin’s Edge 500 has been an extremely popular model, and indeed is their best selling cycle computer. It packs in a myriad of features, has a long battery life, and has a reasonably small footprint meaning it is ideal for most riders. With the Edge 510, Garmin gave their mid-range best seller an overhaul, giving it their new touch screen operating system, connected features, a colour screen, and a redesigned outer casing. Based on features for price, this is more than likely going to be their biggest seller again.

The new version of the firmware running on the Edge 510 changes the graphical interface users will have become used to on previous Edge cycle computers. The new touch screen interface allows the user to swap between bikes and activities in a much quicker and more intuitive way, simply by pressing left and right arrows on the home screen until the relevant bike and activity is selected. For instance, if you had a training bike that you used on a turbo that had speed/cadence sensor, and a race bike that had a power meter, you can now flip between the bikes very quickly, rather than rooting down into sub menus as per the Edge 500. Similarly, multiple activity profiles allows different data to be shown on the screen, and it is now much quicker to choose the activity you require. Once you have the activity and bike chosen, you press “Ride” and the correct data pages and bike information is displayed.

Another big feature of the 510, as with all of the new connected Garmin devices, is the ability to pair (via Bluetooth) your Garmin to your phone. With the 510, this allows live tracking (so a loved one can see where you are on their PC – this could be a good OR bad thing), weather updates, and automatic updating to Garmin Connect once you complete a ride. As with all Bluetooth devices, real world usage is only as good as the Bluetooth link your phone allows, but mostly this works well once the Garmin is paired up to the phone.

Battery life on the 510 is a claimed 20 hours, but as with all electronic devices this is subject to actual usage.

The main points to note on the 510 is that it doesn’t have maps, nor does it have the ability to add them (it has no SD Card slot). It is, of course, ANT+ compatible, so it communicates with compatible heart rate straps, cadence/speed sensors and power meters. It also has the ability to act as a remote control for Garmin’s VIRB cameras.

Another important feature is the fact that the 510 communicates with GLONASS, which is essentially Russia’s alternative to GPS. This means it uses both GLONASS and GPS, meaning your Garmin picks up the satellites in seconds, and has a far better chance of maintaining signal even in heavily wooded or built up areas.

Like the 810 and 1000, the 510 has the ability to download GPX files so you can follow a pre-planned course or route.

The Edge 510 starts at B#249 for the unit only.

Edge 810Edge 810
The 810 is far from a larger version of the 510, which is invariably what most people see when they first begin comparing. The 810 builds on the features and usability of the 510, but has a few tricks up it’s sleeve.

On face value, the obvious difference is screen size – a 1.4″ x 2.2″ display with 160 x 240 pixels over the 510’s 1.7″ x 1.4″ display with 176 x 220 pixels. The knock on effect is the 810 obviously has a bigger form factor, which may put some people off.

However, the biggest difference is the 510’s mapping. Included on the device is a basemap, and it has an SD card slot allowing expansion to more complex maps or maps for different regions than the UK.

The 810 is also works quicker when flicking through menus, and it’s touch screen is slightly more responsive than the 510.

As with the 510, the 810 is ANT+ compatible and uses Bluetooth to communicate with smart phones.

One major thing to note is that unlike the 510 and the 1000, the 810 does not use the GLONASS satellites, and is restricted to just GPS. Battery life is a claimed 17 hours.

The Edge 810 starts at B#319 for the unit only.

Edge 1000Edge 1000
The Edge 1000 is Garmin’s latest super computer. It’s massive 1.5″ x 2.5″ screen is the first thing you notice, followed by just how much this Garmin actually looks and feels like a premium smart phone. Unlike the rubber feeling 510 and the grey plastic 810, the 1000 has more glass and a gloss black surround, with silver metal buttons. Another nice cosmetic touch is the brushed metal plate in the rear of the unit with the Garmin Edge logo etched into it – something you’ll never see but does demonstrate the premium nature of the 1000. To the rear, the unit has a rubber cover that peels back in two places, one to reveal an SD card slot, the other the USB port (which interestingly enough is a micro USB port unlike the mini USB ports used on the other Edge computers – this allows for greater compatibility as more and more phones and devices are using micro USB). Even the packaging on the 1000 is more upmarket – think Apple iPhone versus a cheaper smart phone.

In addition to the upmarket look and feel, bigger screen and impressive packaging, the 1000 flexes it’s muscle in several ways. Most significantly, 1000 comes loaded with a cycle map of Europe – and these maps have free updates for the life of the device. Additionally, the 1000 can be used either landscape or portrait – allowing said mapping to be viewed in a more natural landscape format. Another big feature the 1000 has is Garmin Connect Segments – essentially Garmin’s own version of Strava. Finally, the Edge 1000 is compatible with Shimano’s Di2 electronic shifting, displaying which gear you are in on screen. The 1000 further simplifies the menu system and features a far more intuitive way of connecting with ANT+ devices – rather than pairing devices for a specific bike, the Edge 1000 features a sensor pool where all your connected sensors are stored and the Edge 1000 just picks the devices you are using.

The 1000 has all the same ANT+ and Bluetooth connectivity as the 810 and 510 for compatible ANT+ devices and pairing with a smart phone for live tracking, and retains the GLONASS satellite support of the 510 that is missing from the 810. The 1000 also has Wi-fi support, so data can automatically be synced with Garmin Connect at the end of a ride. You can also share your data with other Edge 1000 users.

New Garmin sensorsOne final feature is the re-designed speed/cadence sensor. The standard GSC 10 sensor that has been around for years now is replaced with 2 new units, one for speed only and one for cadence only. The speed unit wraps around the rear wheel hub (so it can be used on a turbo trainer) and the cadence unit is attached to the non drive side crank and uses an accelerometer (like a phone uses to sense screen orientation) to measure pedal revolutions.

Battery life is a claimed 15 hours, but again, this will be subject to real world usage.

The 1000 starts at B#439 for the unit only.

In conclusion…
Garmin Edge 510 – buy if you want a small, easy to use unit ideal for racing, training and all day riding

Garmin Edge 810 – buy if you want the features of a 510 with the added option of basic navigation, a bigger screen, and slightly more responsive usage

Garmin Edge 1000 – buy if you want full on navigation, the ultimate training and racing companion, or just like to have the latest piece of technology

Stocking filler ideas from Cycle Art

Christmas is fast approaching, and if you’re anything like us, the thought of trailing around department stores and shopping centres to the sound of Slade fills you with dread! However, if you happen to be married to a cyclist, or you’re a cyclist looking to drop a hint, here’s a selection of stocking filler ideas, all available from Cycle Art!

Cycle Art stocking fillers

1. Garmin Edge 510 – B#250 for the headunit only
The new Garmin Edge 510 has all the features of the very popular Edge 500, but with a few added features including a full colour touchscreen, completely redesigned software, Bluetooth communication with your smart phone (for instant upload to Garmin Connect, weather and the ability for others to track your rides online), and faster and more accurate satellite communication thanks to adding GLONASS support. A big thumbs up from Cycle Art for the Edge 510 – a worthy upgrade!

2. Cateye Strada Slim – B#50
Not everyone needs heart rate, GPS, touch screen, and live tracking – and for those who want a simple but effective computer in a well designed and neat package, the Cateye Strada Slim is perfect. Measuring a tiny 47 x 32 x 12.5mm, weighing 12 grams the Strada Slim is a feature packed wireless computer that is perfect for those who don’t need GPS.

3. Lezyne Hecto Drive set – B#55
A great little light set for commuters and roadies who need a back up for when the light fades in the afternoon. With an output of 100 lumens at the front and 15 at the back, each with 5 different lighting modes, these well designed and hard wearing lights are both USB rechargeable and offer quick and easy tool-free installation in seconds.

4. Hope jockey wheels – B#35
Let’s face it, jockey wheels are boring – black and plastic! These Hope upgrades are machined from sold lumps of aluminium, anodized in a range of colours and best of all, they are made right here in the UK!

5. Crank Bros tyre lever – B#6
Ingenious! The Crank Bros tyre lever design means you only need to carry one tyre lever and it not only takes the tyre off, but it helps you put it back on too!

6. Castelli socks – B#various
EVERY man fears getting socks for Christmas. Unless they are made by Castelli of course! We have a wide range of Castelli socks ranging from their lightweight, wicking summer socks to their thick, wooly winter ones. Tell your granny to get these…

7. Fi’zi:k silicone seatpost rings – B#4.00
Available in various colours and 3 different sizes, these rings go on your seatpost just above the seatclamp and prevents the wet, mud and salt trickling down the inside of your seat tube into your bottom bracket. And they look quite cool, too.

8. Velo Culture gifts – B#various
Knecklaces, ear rings, belts, cufflinks, chains, and keyrings, all made locally and all made out of bike parts – chain links, tyres, cable and cable ends! Great little gifts that also helps a local business thrive!

9. Token bike bling – B#various
Some of us think the way our bike looks is important. Token offer a wide range of parts in various anodized colours including barrel adjusters, bottle cage bolts, headset spacers, skewers, crank bolts, headset caps and chain guides. You can quite literally colour code very aspect of your bike!

10. Caffe Praego ground coffee
For anyone who has had a coffee in Cycle Art, you’ll know just how nice Cafe Praego coffee is. Caffe Praego filter coffee is ethically sourced from some of the finest co-operatives in Central America and Africa, it is roasted and ground to perfection. Caffe Praego Supports the Point Foundation which is a registered charity (1126392) who look after orphans in Africa.

11. Cotton Caps – from B#15
Love them or hate them, cotton caps are a tradition of cycling. No Christmas stocking is complete without a cotton cap of some sort – just ask James!

12. Lezyne RAP tools – B#various
Lezyne have a habit of making some of the best engineered tools around, so much so that we use a lot of them in the shop and workshop. Their RAP mini tools are strong and reliable, and come in a range of sizes and configurations depending on what you want to carry with you.

13. Gift Vouchers
If, after all the above, you are still undecided, why not buy some Cycle Art gift vouchers. Available in denominations of B#10, these are the perfect (and easy) gift for Christmas.

In the spotlight… the Cervelo R Series

DSC-7540-9ca18549-857e-4469-bdb4-3b77b37e8c33-0-960x480

Canada. Home of ice hockey, the maple leaf, mounties, AM radio, and Pamela Anderson. And of course, high end bike manufacturer, Cervelo.

In the second of our “In the spotlight” series, we look at Canada’s most famous cycling export (alongside Svein Tuft, Alison Sydor, Michael Barry and of course, Ryder Hesjedal).

It’s hard to believe, given their elevated status in the bike industry, and the fact that it feels like they have been a permanent fixture of the professional peleton, triathlon, and Iron Man competition for many years, that Cervelo was only formed in 1995. In just 18 years, Cervelo have gone from a tiny start up to being one of the most desirable brands in cycling.

Gianni Bugno's TT bikeCervelo was founded by Phil White and Gerard Vroomen. Prior to Cervelo, the pair were working as engineers in bicycle and Human Powered Vehicle design, before being approached by two time world champion Gianni Bugno to design the fastest possible time trial bike for him. The bike they came up with was groundbreaking – too groundbreaking for Bugno’s sponsors and the bike was never raced.

Undeterred, and with multiple athletes interested in their unique approach to bicycle design, later that year with just two models in their range, White and Vroomen started Cervelo. The rest, they say, was history.

By 1998, Cervelo had multiple national time trial championships to their name. In 2001, the P3 was launched, and quickly established itself as the standard by which all time trial and triathlon machines were measured. The following year saw the introduction of the Soloist, the bike that started the aero bike revolution. In 2003, Cervelo became the bike supplier for Team CSC – making them the youngest ever bicycle company to sponsor a pro tour team – a sponsorship deal that would last six years and see Team CSC climb to be the number 1 ranked Pro Tour team.

Sastre winsWith Carlos Sastre winning the Tour de France on board his Cervelo R3SL, Cervelo found itself being hailed as one of the most desirable bicycle brands on the planet.

The R Series

For our “In the spotlight” feature, we look at the single most important product launch from 2005, when Cervelo launched the groundbreaking R3, the first ever Cervelo to use the company’s proprietary Squoval tubing, a concept that Cervelo still use in today’s R Series of frames. The R3 essentially set the mould from which all future lightweight Cervelo road bikes would be made, and quickly established the R Series bikes as a standard by which all other lightweight or “climbing” bikes would be measured.

Over the years, the R Series bikes have gone through a process of evolution rather than revolution, which only demonstrates the confidence Cervelo (and it’s customers) have in their product.

For 2014, both the R5 and R3 are brand new, and Cervelo took the lessons learned with the development of the spectacular Project California and applied them to a production road bikes. In order to understand the R5 and R3, we must first take a closer look at the California.

R5caThe R5ca

In 2008, Cervelo began an engineering project based in California to research into methods of producing lighter and stiffer bicycle frames. Rather than outsourcing the research, or head hunting experts from other industries, Cervelo developed their own staff and facilities. The result of of this ambitious project was the R5ca, a bike frame Cervelo claim is 100 grams lighter and 20% stiffer than it’s nearest competitor. In 2012, the R5ca was ridden by Ryder Hesjedal to victory in the Giro d’Italia, proving it’s credentials as a super bike.

The Rca
Cervelo never sit still. If they did, competitors in the fast moving bicycle industry would over take them and their products would be out of date. The lessons learned when developing the R5ca were translated into a production bike in the form of the R5, and work began on the next version of the Project California bike.

In 2013, Cervelo launched the groundbreaking Rca.

RcaFor the first time, Cervelo’s California team joined forces with the Toronto team to combine the knowledge of the lessons learned developing the S series of bikes with that of the Project California. The aim was to not only improve the structural design of the R5ca, but also to increase the aerodynamics. The RCA went through 93 different frame shapes and 279 Finite Element Analysis tests until the engineers were happy with the RCA and their new Squoval3 tubing profiles. Cervelo opted to use special high grade 3M PowerLux composites and resins which offer superior stiffness to weight, and to increase steerer tube strength they use a proprietary Integran/PowerMetal Nanovate coating technology. The result was a frameset that weighs under 700 grams and offers an aerodynamic saving of 7.4 watts at 40kmh. However, at B#7500 for the frameset, the RcA really is a lottery winner’s dream.

R5 and R3

The Rca is an important tool for Cervelo when developing their production road bikes. Just as the previous incarnations of R5 and R3 were developed using lessons learned from the R5ca, so the 2014 R5 and R3 were developed using the Rca as a starting point.

The new Cervelo R5

By using a slightly lower grade and more cost effective composite, whilst shifting production from California to the Far East, and electing to not use the Integran/PowerMetal Nanovate steerer tube, and using a different bottom bracket design, Cervelo can offer a production version of the Rca in the form of the R5 for half the price. The R5 frameset makes use of all the same moulds, geometry and frame design as the Rca, including the new Squoval3 tubing profiles developed by the Project California team and internal, future-proof cable routing. Cervelo claim it has a 9.5% stiffer bottom bracket and a 15% increase in torsional head tube stiffness. Weight is a claimed 808g for an average frame, making it 18g lighter than the previous R5.

Cycle Art recently sold a Dura-Ace equipped R5 to a customer, and he could not speak highly enough of the Cervelo. For the full review of his bike, visit our review centre.

Revamped Cervelo R3The R3, which is Cervelo’s best selling road bike, also receives a full revamp. Using the same Squoval3 tubing and internal cable routing at the R5 but with a lower grade of carbon and a different fork means the R3 weighs in at 980g, easily hitting the magic sub 1kg mark. Not only that, it still retains similar stiffness and handling as the R5 but at a more aggressive price point.

R3 Dark

Earlier in the year, at the 2014 model range product launch, Cervelo announced they were using up stocks of the 2013 R5 frame by painting it a different colour and calling it the “R3 Dark”. Two variations were made, a 105 equipped version for B#2000 and a SRAM Force 22 equipped version for B#3000 (the frame alone is worth B#3500). By the second day of the show, UK dealers had bought up all the 105 stock, and most of the Force stock. Cycle Art currently has a 51cm and a 58cm left in stock for 2 lucky people who want them.

The usual Cervelo design features…
All R Series bikes make use of the BBRight bottom bracket standard, a 30mm pressfit bottom bracket that has a wider bottom bracket shell that increases stiffness around the bottom bracket area. We’d recommend using Rotor’s super stiff 3DF chainset to make the best use of the BBRight design. In addition, all the R Series bikes make use of a tapered 1 3/8″ steerer tube (for improved stiffness and handling) and SmartWall tubing technology (Cervelo’s way of saying they use carbon where it is needed and not where it isn’t).

Make no mistake, Cervelo have achieved their status in the industry for a reason. It helps that their marketing department knows how to attract customers and create catchy trademarks. However, all the marketing in the world is pointless unless the product can back up the claims made by the marketing department and fortunately for Cervelo, it can.

Cervelo R5 – our quickest selling bike ever!

Cervelo R5When it comes to lightweight, super stiff race bikes, Cervelo are up there with the best. Cervelo bikes have become such a permanent installation in the pro peleton that it’s sometimes easy to forget that the company has only been around since 1995. Founders Gerard Vroomen and Phil White have taken Cervelo from a small, privately owned bicycle company into one of the most famous and revered bike brands in the world and is regarded by many as being the Apple Computer of the bike world.

The Canadian company may not have the heritage and tradition of some of the bike brands in the peleton, but what they lack in history they more than make up for with their extensive use of groundbreaking and innovative technologies, all of which come with fancy marketing names and acronyms.

On the top of Cervelo road bike pile is their much vaunted Project California or RcA, a no expenses spared experiment into bicycle frame design, pushing the boundaries of what is possible. The current RcA is a limited edition, hand made 667g frame, built in California and finished in Canada. If you need to ask how much it costs, you probably can’t afford it.

Cervelo are another company who adopt the trickle down effect, in fact they openly admit that the RcA exists to learn lessons from for their mass production bikes. The R5 is just that – a more affordable production version of the RCA. At B#5199 for a Dura Ace equipped R5, or B#5299 for a SRAM Red version, the R5 is far from cheap. However, the fact is most of the Garmin Sharp team used the R5 during the 2013 race season, so if it’s good enough for them, it’s good enough for us.

After the success of the R3 Dark (essentially last year’s R5 painted as an R3), side by side in the shop you can see how the new R5 demonstrates a move on from the previous model. With more aerodynamic Squoval 3 tubing, internal cable routing, and clearance for 25mm tyres, the R5 uses Cervelo’s methodology of evolution rather than revolution.

The R5 we had in the shop (it lasted about half an hour on the shop floor before a customer put a set of Mavic Cosmic C40 wheels on and bought it) attracted the most attention we have ever seen.

The full gallery of the R5 can be seen at http://www.pinterest.com/cyclea/cervelo-r5/

Cervelo launch new R5, R3 and introduce R3 Dark Edition…

New Cervelo R5

Fridays are already great. But when Cervelo announces a new bike, the day can only get better.

Using lessons learned whilst developing the already legendary Project Californa (Cervelo’s 700g super frame), the Canadian company has announced a new R5 for 2014. Using aero-tuned Squoval 3 tubing (Cervelo’s proprietary square/oval tubing), a brand new fork design, internal cable routing, guides for mechanical or electronic wiring and hydraulic hoses, and a 27.2mm seatpost, the new R5 represents is a major step forward. Frame weight is a claimed 808g with the fork tipping the scales at 315g. To keep costs down, some technology is obviously missing from the uber expensive RCA, such as the 3Mbs nano-tech Powerlux resin and the Nanovate coating used on the RCAbs fork steerer – primarily as this technology is either too expensive, or can only be applied in Canada (the R5 is made in the Far East).

Cervelo claim the new R5 has a 9.5% stiffer bottom bracket, offers a 15% increase in torsional head tube stiffness, and due to the Squoval 3 tubes it represents a 7.4 watt aero advantage. Whilst we at Cycle Art don’t doubt these figures, all we really care about is how it looks and rides. At first glance, it’s a stunner and rest assured as soon as they become available we will be ordering them in to test ride.

The new R5 should be available in October.

New R3

Also available in October will be a revamped R3. It too inherits the Squoval 3 tubes, but with a different fork to the R5. Frame weight is a claimed 980g, and the geometry will be the same as the R5. It will be available as a frameset or built with Ultegra or Ultegra Di2 – but Cycle Art will be able to build whatever you want.

Cervelo R3 DarkR3 Dark Edition

If you can’t wait that long (or fancy a bargain), available immediately is the rather pretty Cervelo R3 Dark Edition. Available with SRAM Force 22 (or anything else you fancy if we do a custom build for you), the R3 Dark Edition is essentially a 2013 R5 frame in a custom colour way with an R3 sticker on. Bare in the mind the R5 frameset alone cost B#3500 last year, you can now pick up at Force 22 equipped R3 for B#2999.

A word of warning – the R3 Dark is a limited edition bicycle and Cervelo have already sold out of the B#2000 105 version, so if you fancy a Canadian wolf in sheep’s clothing we would suggest you get your order in quickly. With the new R5 and R3 hitting the shores in October, the R3 Dark will only be around for a short time.